Approximately 1 percent of the population has a gambling addiction. Most people can gamble for fun and stop when they want to, but people living with a gambling addiction may find it impossible to stop gambling, even after they’ve run out of money.

When most people think of addiction, they think of drugs and alcohol, but certain behaviors can be just as addictive as substances. An addiction to a behavior, like gambling, is referred to as a process addiction. People with addictions to gambling often continue to gamble despite experiencing negative consequences financially, professionally or personally.

Some common signs of gambling addiction include:

  • Placing larger, riskier bets
  • Ruminating on past wins
  • Using gambling as a distraction from other problems
  • Hiding gambling behavior
  • Social isolation
  • Feeling guilty after gambling
  • Failure to stop or reduce gambling
  • Experiencing powerful urges to gamble

Problem Gambling Self-Assessment

If you recognize symptoms of gambling addiction in yourself, take this gambling self-assessment to learn how to tell if you have a gambling problem. While not a formal clinical diagnosis, the results of this quiz can help you better understand how your gambling habits affect your life.

The quiz contains 12 questions related to gambling addiction.

Please answer “yes” or “no.” In the past six months, have you:

Missed time from work or school due to gambling?
Felt remorse after gambling?
Gambled to make money to pay debts or solve financial difficulties?
Felt that you needed to gamble to win back money you lost during previous gambling sessions?
Gambled until you ran out of money?
Borrowed money to finance your gambling?
Sold personal or stolen property to finance your gambling?
Gambled for a longer period than you initially planned?
Gambled as a way to escape worry, boredom, loneliness or loss?
Engaged in illegal activities to finance your gambling?
Been emotionally distressed or lost sleep because of gambling?
Experienced intense urges to gamble after receiving good or bad news?

Your confidential assessment results will appear on the next page. Please enter your information to proceed to your results.

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