Mixing Alcohol and Muscle Relaxers

Muscle relaxers are something a lot of people take for various reasons, but they don’t necessarily understand the dangers and side effects of mixing alcohol & muscle relaxers. Below is more information about muscle relaxers in general, possible interactions between alcohol and muscle relaxers, and the dangers and side effects of mixing alcohol & muscle relaxers.

Alcohol and Muscle Relaxers | Dangers and Side Effects of Mixing Alcohol & Muscle Relaxers
Muscle relaxers, also often referred to as muscle relaxants, are frequently used by people who suffer from spasms related to back pain or multiple sclerosis. They’re usually prescribed by doctors as a short-term treatment for acute back pain, and the reason they’re intended as a short-term treatment option is because there is a potential for abuse and dependence with their use.

You might experience not just pain but more specifically spasms, cramping or twitching that may necessitate a muscle relaxer.

What usually happens in these instances is that the doctor will first recommend that someone tries an over-the-counter pain reliever such as Tylenol or Advil, but if these don’t work or someone can’t take them because of something like a liver issue, they may be prescribed a muscle relaxer. Muscle relaxers can also help people who aren’t able to sleep because of pain since one of the side effects is sleepiness.

Some of the general side effects of muscle relaxers include tiredness or sedation, fatigue, weakness, dizziness, dry mouth, depression and low blood pressure. Even when not combining alcohol and muscle relaxers you’re advised not to drive or operate machinery after taking them because of the side effects.

For most people, the effects of muscle relaxers become noticeable within about thirty minutes after taking them, and they last for four to six hours.

Some of the dangers and side effects of mixing alcohol & muscle relaxers relate to the increased risk of abuse and addiction. This is a topic that should be discussed on its own, even outside of the conversation of alcohol and muscle relaxers, because it can happen with or without alcohol. For some people, muscle relaxers are addictive, and you increase your chances of developing an addiction if you take them without a prescription or you take higher doses than what’s instructed by your doctor.

There is one primary muscle relaxer that tends to be most often abused and lead to addiction, and that’s carisoprodol or Soma. Soma is a Schedule IV controlled substance, and when your body breaks it down it creates something called meprobamate, which is a sedative. People may become addicted to muscle relaxers as a way to relax. Other muscle relaxers have been linked to addiction as well.

If you become reliant on these drugs, even when you’re not mixing alcohol and muscle relaxers, you may notice that when you stop taking the drugs, you go through withdrawal symptoms.

Abuse and addiction are two of the biggest dangers and side effects of mixing alcohol and muscle relaxers, but not the only ones.

It’s common for people to drink, but there are dangers and side effects of mixing alcohol and muscle relaxers that aren’t well understood by a lot of people.

First, both alcohol and muscle relaxers suppress the activity of the nervous system. One of the dangers and side effects of mixing alcohol and muscle relaxers is that your nervous system can become so depressed that it’s hard for you to move your muscles at all.

When alcohol and muscle relaxers are combined, it can also lead to severe sedation that can lead to an increased risk of accidents, impaired judgment, and other logistical concerns.

When alcohol and muscle relaxers are combined, it may reduce the effectiveness of the muscle relaxer, which can then lead a person to take more of the drugs, which can become dangerous as well.

Finally, the dangers and side effects of mixing alcohol and muscle relaxers can lead to such a strong reaction that a person’s breathing and heart rate are affected. This is similar to what happens when someone overdoses on opioids an example. Opioids slow the respiratory system so much that breathing can slow to a dangerous level or stop altogether, and that is possible with alcohol and muscle relaxers as well.

You should never mix alcohol and muscle relaxers, and there are many reasons for this. First, if you mix alcohol and muscle relaxers it can lead to an increased risk of developing an addiction to these substances, and muscle relaxers on their own are already addictive.

Combining alcohol and muscle relaxers can also heighten the side effects of both, and lead to sedation.

Much like an overdose, when you combine alcohol and muscle relaxers it can also cause the respiratory system to slow down so much that you stop breathing, which can ultimately result in death.

Mixing Alcohol and Muscle Relaxers
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