Lazanda Withdrawal and Detox

Lazanda Addiction Hotline

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Lazanda is a pain-relieving medication given to patients who are experiencing sudden, breakthrough pain due to cancer. This is an effective medication for patients who are already taking moderate to large amounts of opioid pain medications regularly.

Lazanda itself is an opioid analgesic, which means that it changes the way the brain and the body respond to pain. Lazanda should only be used for breakthrough pain and not for mild or short-term pain due to headaches, dental procedures or surgeries.

Patients who begin using Lazanda may notice side effects, which are typical for starting treatment with any new medication. Common side effects of Lazanda include nausea, vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, dizziness, drowsiness, fever, and headaches. These should all decrease or go away entirely after you have been using Lazanda for a while. If they do not go away or get worse, promptly let your doctor know.

More serious Lazanda side effects include mood changes, agitation, confusion, hallucinations, severe stomach or abdominal pain, difficulty urinating, slow heartbeat, loss of appetite, unusual tiredness, and weight loss.

Seek medical attention immediately if you experience any of these serious side effects or fainting, seizure, slow or shallow breathing, severe drowsiness, or difficulty waking up after using Lazanda.

Lazanda Withdrawal and Detox
Patients who no longer wish to treat their pain with Lazanda should first set up a meeting with their doctor to discuss the best way to get off the medication. Lazanda should never be stopped suddenly or “cold turkey,” as this can produce unwanted withdrawal symptoms. In most cases, doctors will gradually lower a Lazanda patient’s dosage over time so that their body can adjust to less and less of the medication. This tapering off approach will help patients avoid experiencing Lazanda withdrawal symptoms. Remember, you should never adjust your Lazanda dosage or treatment schedule unless you doctor explicitly tells you to.
Common short-term Lazanda withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, insomnia, muscle aches, increased tearing, runny nose, excessive sweating, increased yawning, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, goosebumps, increased body temperature, rapid pulse, and high blood pressure.

Once these short-term withdrawal symptoms subside, some patients may experience withdrawal symptoms which can last for additional weeks or months after a patient has stopped using Lazanda. These can include anxiety, depression, sleep problems, fatigue, emotional blunting, and irritability.

The Lazanda withdrawal timeline is different for every patient. On average, symptoms will begin between 6 to 12 hours after Lazanda was last used. The symptoms will then peak for 1 to 3 days and usually go away within 5 to 7 days. For some patients, it may take up to 10 to 20 days for the all the Lazanda withdrawal symptoms to subside.
If you are having trouble managing withdrawal symptoms of Lazanda, you may want to consider a medically-assisted detoxification program. In this program, patients can safely detox while being able to come to medical professionals with any struggles or questions they have regarding their withdrawal.
Always keep a list of your current medications and share this information with your doctor, as some medications can cause an interaction with Lazanda. Medications which interact with Lazanda include decongestant nasal sprays and pain medications such as nalbuphine, butorphanol, and naltrexone.

Other medications can change how quickly Lazanda is removed from the body and, therefore, influence its effectiveness. These include itraconazole, ketoconazole, cimetidine, calcium channel blockers, HIV protease inhibitors, macrolide antibiotics, nefazodone, rifamycins, and certain seizure medications.

Using MAO inhibitors while taking Lazanda can produce a serious and even fatal drug interaction. The following MAO inhibitors should be avoided while you are taking Lazanda: isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, safinamide, selegiline, and tranylcypromine. Most MAO inhibitors should not be used within two weeks before beginning Lazanda treatment.

Always keep a list of your current medications and share this information with your doctor, as some medications can cause an interaction with Lazanda. Medications which interact with Lazanda include decongestant nasal sprays and pain medications such as nalbuphine, butorphanol, and naltrexone.

Other medications can change how quickly Lazanda is removed from the body and, therefore, influence its effectiveness. These include itraconazole, ketoconazole, cimetidine, calcium channel blockers, HIV protease inhibitors, macrolide antibiotics, nefazodone, rifamycins, and certain seizure medications.

Using MAO inhibitors while taking Lazanda can produce a serious and even fatal drug interaction. The following MAO inhibitors should be avoided while you are taking Lazanda: isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, safinamide, selegiline, and tranylcypromine. Most MAO inhibitors should not be used within two weeks before beginning Lazanda treatment.

Lazanda Withdrawal & Detox
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