Viibryd – See Related Topics

One of the newer drugs used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD) is Viibryd (vilazodone), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) used to regulate the reuptake of serotonin in the user’s brain. Irregularities in serotonin, one of the several important naturally-occurring chemicals in the brain, is a main culprit in mood disorders. Viibryd not only acts to block serotonin reabsorption, it also acts like serotonin on certain brain receptors. This combination of actions makes it more successful for treatment of MDD – especially with people who have not seen successful results when taking other antidepressant medications.

Side effects while using Viibryd can include worsening depression, seizure, suicidal thoughts, muscle twitching, agitation, panic attacks, lucid dreams, blood pressure abnormalities, convulsion and more.

Addiction can occur but is not typical. If a person taking an antidepressant decides to suddenly stop its use, they can start to feel any combination of the drug’s side effects and possibly even relapse to the mental state they were in prior to beginning use. As such, a reluctance to feel these symptoms leads to the person resuming use or increasing the dose to attempt to manage the withdrawal symptoms. This can lead to dependence on Viibryd, and then an addiction has formed.

Whether you’ve used the prescription drug Viibryd yourself or know someone who has, you may have questions about it. For answers, select a related topic or call a representative from The Recovery Village to learn more.


Viibryd Related Topics

Mixing Viibryd and AlcoholPatients are advised to avoid alcohol while taking antidepressants because mixing the two can make depression symptoms worse and counteract the work being done by the antidepressant itself. In addition, alcohol can increase the chances of experiencing side effects while taking vilazodone and can make you very dizzy.