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Mike Candelaria

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Mike Candelaria is a 30-year veteran of the magazine industry in Central Florida, having served as a writer and editor for numerous publications. Those publications range from city/regional and business magazines to travel/leisure and sports magazines. Formerly, he was the editor of Orlando magazine and the 1996 president of the Florida Magazine Association. He is well-known in the Central Florida community, working with high-profile organizations such as the Orlando Regional Chamber of Commerce, Metro Orlando Economic Development Commission and Visit Orlando. He is a graduate of the University of Central Florida.

Articles by Mike

Want to quit smoking? Here’s who can help you kick the habit: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/get-healthy-orlando/os-get-healthy-quit-smoking-20180109-story.html

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Latest Articles
The unofficial epicenter for opioid abuse? Ohio largely earns that distinction – and it’s not the kind of No. 1 ranking the Buckeye State desires. Opioids are used to “treat moderate to severe pain that may not respond well to other pain medications,” it reads on the popular WedMD site online. So, if you have pain, beware.
Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed Executive Order 17-146, directing a Public Health Emergency and declaring an opioid epidemic across the state. Find more about it here.
Despite his ‘battle within that will never end,’ recovering drug and alcohol addict Ken DeCesare is reaching out as he pulls himself up.
More than anything else, the emphasis is squarely on one component: the patients. Or, perhaps more specifically, you.“There isn’t one single path to recovery. Each person has to take his or her own path,” asserts Dana Giblock, clinical director at The Recovery Village.
Griggs refers to the acronym HOW. He used it back then, and he continues to use it today, both for himself as a person in recovery as well as for others. “I practiced HOW through being honest, staying open-minded and becoming willing to do what was necessary,” he explains. “Those three attitudes are indispensable when it comes to being successful in recovery.”