Long-term methamphetamine use can cause severe physical side effects and may also trigger the development of mental health disorders. Conversely, someone may have started using meth to cope with symptoms of a mental health disorder.

Signs and symptoms of a mental condition are typically present during the “crash,” or come down, part of meth use and can last for a few days or weeks depending on the person and the amount of meth they consumed. Side effects of meth use have been known to resemble symptoms of psychosis and schizophrenia. Meth use may trigger an underlying mental health disorder and cause existing conditions to worsen.

Treatment for co-occurring meth addictions and mental health conditions is available at rehab centers across the country, including The Recovery Village.

Common Co-Occuring Mental Health Disorders With Meth Use

Relationship Between Mental Health and Meth

Some common short term side effects of meth use that resemble symptoms of a mental health disorder include:

Common side effects of long-term meth use that are similar to mental health disorder symptoms include:

Mental Health and Meth Statistics

People who struggle with meth use disorder may also have co-occurring mental health problems. Read more on the dangers of meth, current meth use statistics and meth rehab success rates on this page from The Recovery Village.

Treatment for Meth Addiction and Comorbid Mental Health Disorders

Treatment for co-occurring meth addictions and mental health conditions is available at rehab centers across the country, including The Recovery Village.

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.