Meth addiction had a powerful hold on Brent and Ashley Walker. Brent started doing drugs to cope with his brother’s death. At 21 years old, he was selling drugs. Then he met his future wife, Ashley, who struggled with methamphetamines. In an interview with “Good Morning America,” the couple discussed the ways meth was detrimental to them. The drug compromised both of their health. They were thin, addicted and unwell.

Brent was incarcerated and served prison time and then probation for selling meth. Even after prison, Brent continued to use drugs until a nearly failed drug test scared him into sobriety. Together, he and his wife committed to a sober lifestyle and have now enjoyed nearly three years of living drug-free. Meth addiction stories like these can provide a source of hope for people who may be struggling with substance abuse. Quitting meth use is possible.

How They Kicked Crystal

Brent’s time in prison didn’t guarantee his sobriety, but nearly failing a drug test after release proved to be the final motivator he needed to quit doing drugs. Brent and Ashley both attended recovery programs at their church and Ashley attended a religious rehabilitation program. Brent and Ashley’s well-being before and after recovery was a striking contrast, as meth quickly deteriorates people’s mental and physical state.

Meth recovery stories can help people who are caught in this highly addictive cycle of drug use to achieve sobriety and stay that way. The high of meth is its appeal, but the dark side of continued use includes symptoms like paranoia, anxiety and even mental health disorders. People who use meth regularly may not know how to quit meth, but recovery is possible.

Their Message: Recovery Is Possible

Through their viral photo and platform for interviews, Brent and Ashley want people to know that addiction recovery is possible. Brent went on to get his GED. The couple’s relationship has been transformed by the absence of drugs, with fewer fights and more understanding.

The couple also started a Facebook page called “Hope for Addicts in Need” and is seeking to continue their positive message that with the right treatment and support, life after drugs is attainable and meth addiction treatment can be successful. Methamphetamines impact the body in powerful ways that, over time, break down decision-making abilities. This break down can make someone who is addicted to meth feel powerless to stop. Because of the way meth impairs the brain, using it comes to feel like an involuntary practice. Meth addiction recovery provides the right resources and guidance to help people overcome addiction.

Families and friends wonder how to help someone with methamphetamine addiction. Finding and sharing helpful resources is an important component of feeling empowered to effect change. While it may take time for someone who is addicted to meth to agree to treatment, being armed with the right information and opportunities when that time comes is valuable.

Finding Help with Meth Addiction

There are several ways to help someone who is addicted to meth. Some ways include:

  • Learning about the drug
  • Learning about the detox process
  • Do not confront someone when they are on meth
  • Reaching out for professional help

Meth addiction isn’t a death sentence. There is hope and help in recovery for people who are addicted to meth. Drug rehab and other resources are available to help people find long-term sobriety.

If you or someone you love is struggling with a meth addiction, contact The Recovery Village today to explore treatment options available to you. Help is here.

Signs of Meth Addiction

You may use meth recreationally and wonder if you have developed an addiction. Whether or not you feel you can easily stop using meth, there are some signs that it is adversely impacting your health. Unhealed meth sores may persist in your mouth. You may feel more paranoid than usual. Meth and weight loss are a factor, so you may see yourself becoming thin or feeling weak.

Are You Addicted to Meth?

Take The Recovery Village’s meth addiction self-assessment quiz to evaluate your risk of meth addiction.