Baclofen Addiction Related Topics

As a muscle relaxant, baclofen (brand names Gablofen and Lioresal) eases the painful symptoms associated with epilepsy, a spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy, among other conditions. This antispastic agent reduces stiffness, spasms and pain, but soothing these symptoms isn’t the only way people use baclofen. Like methadone and naltrexone, baclofen has proven useful in reducing drug-motivated behaviors for people addicted to opiates or amphetamines. However, baclofen carries its own abuse potential, and it’s possible to misuse this drug designed to help heal addiction.

Ingested in large amounts or mixed with other substances like alcohol, baclofen can produce a pleasurable sensation similar to being drunk. People may take increasingly larger amounts of this drug to feel the same euphoria, which can lead to a baclofen use disorder. If you suspect this kind of addiction in yourself or a loved one, search by topic or keyword below to find out more about baclofen addiction. Don’t see the information you need? Want to get started with a treatment program for baclofen misuse? Call The Recovery Village at 352.771.2700 to speak with an associate who can answer your questions and talk through your situation. The call is toll-free, confidential, and can help you or a loved one find effective treatment for baclofen addiction.


Baclofen Related Topics

Baclofen Mixing It and AlcoholBaclofen is a prescription muscle relaxant, used primarily to treat skeletal spasticity. Baclofen can treat muscle spasms related to Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries and spinal cord diseases. Baclofen isn’t intended to treat conditions like Parkinson’s disease, cerebral palsy or stroke.
Baclofen While Pregnant: What You Need to KnowIn animal studies where baclofen was given orally, it was shown to increase the likelihood of omphaloceles in fetuses. Taking a high dose of baclofen could potentially pass to the baby.