What is Ultram?

Ultram is the brand name version of the drug tramadol. This is described as a narcotic-like painkiller that can be prescribed for the treatment of pain ranging from moderate to severe. It’s available as an extended-release version called Ultram ER, and the extended release treatment option is reserved for around-the-clock pain treatment, as opposed to treating pain on an acute, as-needed basis.

Ultram or tramadol can be taken following surgery as an example, while the extended-release or long-acting tablet versions of this painkiller are meant for pain that’s chronic and ongoing.

As mentioned, as with other narcotic painkillers, Ultram is available only by a prescription, and it’s described as an opioid agonist, a controlled substance, and a highly addictive painkiller. Ultram is not only addictive, but people using it may experience a physical dependence which means withdrawal can occur when someone takes this medicine for a period of time and then tries to suddenly stop using it without weaning off.

Along with being sold under the brand name Ultram, tramadol also comes under other brand names including Conzip and Rybix.

As an opioid analgesic, when someone takes Ultram it changes how their brain perceives and responds to pain, and Ultram is unique because it may also increase the amount of available norepinephrine and serotonin in the system of the user.

The FDA approved tramadol in 1995 under the brand name Ultram, and then in 2002, a generic version was approved.

There is some research showing that if people take Ultram or tramadol before surgery, it may not only help with pain, but it can help shivering which frequently occurs following anesthesia.

Ultram Addiction: What is Ultram and is it Addictive?
There is a potential for abuse with tramadol, because of the opioid-like effects of the drug, so people are warned about the Ultram addiction potential when they’re prescribed the drug. When you take any opioid, it releases a flood of dopamine into your brain, particularly when you take higher doses. This can lead to the feel-good effect or the high that’s often associated with prescription painkillers, and your brain may start to feel as if it wants to take more of these drugs to recreate that sense of euphoria.

There is also a warning accompanying tramadol tablets including Ultram from the FDA. Doctors are told not to prescribe this medicine to people who are suicidal, at a high risk of developing an addiction, have drug or alcohol abuse problems, are depressed, take tranquilizers or who take antidepressants. If people take Ultram with another drug that increases the amount of serotonin in their brain, such as an antidepressant, it can put them at risk for serotonin syndrome.

As was touched on above, the answer to “is Ultram addictive” is yes. Any drug with an opioid-like component can be addictive because of the high it can create.

Along with the Ultram addiction potential, this drug also may lead to physical dependence. Dependence is different from addiction. When you’re dependent on an opioid pain medicine, it means that your body has become physically used to its presence, so when you stop taking it suddenly, you go into somewhat of a shock. That’s what leads to withdrawal symptoms.

Another risk of Ultram addiction is the potential for overdose. When you take Tramadol or other opioids, it depresses your respiratory system and central nervous system. This is what leads to death following an overdose. The longer you take this drug, the more at risk you are for developing a tolerance and taking higher doses to get the same effect. That increases your risk of not only Ultram addiction but also an Ultram overdose.

To sum up, what is Ultram? Ultram is a combination pain reliever with a narcotic or opioid element, which is tramadol. Is Ultram addictive? Yes, there is an Ultram addiction potential, and this is a drug that should be taken exactly as instructed to reduce this risk and also to avoid dangerous side effects.

Ultram Addiction
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Ultram Addiction was last modified: July 27th, 2017 by The Recovery Village